Paper News Page

  • 102
    India needs shot in arm for recycling paper
    AUGUST-2012 – Recycling paper, is essentially, turning waste paper into new paper. According to Tappi (the leading technical association for the worldwide pulp, paper and converting industry), the paper recycling process, involves mixing of wastepaper with water and chemicals to break it down. The broken residue is then chopped up and heated to convert it into strands of cellulose, called pulp or slurry. This pulp is then cleaned, “deinked”, bleached, and mixed with water and converted into new paper. Recycling paper has a big impact on saving wood that is used to generate the paper. For example, according to the environmental paper network, recycling a tonne of newsprint saves about a tonne of wood, while recycling a tonne of printing or copier paper, saves slightly more than two tonnes of wood. Also, it is believed that recycling paper saves energy. For example, the energy information administration claims a 40 per cent reduction in energy when paper is recycled, compared with paper made with unrecycled pulp, while the bureau of international recycling (BIR) claims a 64 per cent reduction. In addition, the US environmental protection agency (EPA) has found that recycling causes 35 per cent less water pollution and 74 per cent less air pollution than making new paper. Also, according to EPA, about 35 per cent of municipal solid waste (before recycling) by weight is paper and paper products that would not enter landfills if it is recycled. Although, the potential and benefits for recycling paper seem immense, very little paper is recycled in India. According to the Indian Paper Manufacturers Association (IPMA), in India, only about 20 per cent waste paper is being recycled every year. This low recycling rate is mainly on account of alternate use of paper in wrapping, packing, and the lack of source segregation that makes waste paper contaminated and unusable. Thus, India lacks collection, sorting and grading system of waste paper for proper utilisation. IPMA believes that this rate of paper recycling in India is very low, compared with other countries. Paper recycling rate in Germany is 73 per cent, in Sweden, it is 69 per cent, in Japan, it is 60 per cent, in western Europe, it is 56 per cent, in the US, it is 49 per cent, and in Italy, it is 45 per cent. In fact, the US postal service recycles more than a million tonnes of scrap paper and $160 million worth of recycled paper each year. It has even won the environmental mailer award. In a recent report, the Central Pulp & Paper Research Institute (CPPRI) has stated that by 2010, about half of the global amount of fibres used in papermaking will be recycled fibres. However, the report admits that recycled fibre sourcing in India is a challenge. The 20 per cent Indian recycling estimate, is alarming given that the projected demand for fresh paper in India will be likely around 21 million tonnes over the next few years, according to ITC and Indian Agro & Recycled Paper Mills Association (IARPMA). This amount of paper consumption is likely, because in India, per capita paper consumption has been increasing: To 9.18 kg in 2009-10 from 8.3 kg during 2008-09. Also, given the poor recycling rate in India, unsorted waste and dumps would likely fill nearby landfills. In this regard, paper recycling seems to offer a partial answer to this problem, because every tonne of paper recycled, saves more than 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space. Although, India has been behind in recycling paper, of late, IPMA has taken a number of recycling initiatives. For instance, last year, ITC’s paperboards and specialty papers division, launched a waste paper collection programme called “wealth out of waste (WOW)”, in select areas in Hyderabad, Bangalore and Coimbatore, and is now, expanding it include more areas in south India, including Chennai. WOW is a recycling initiative that works towards spreading awareness about recycling and encourages people to segregate and dispose waste responsibly. It is an internationally recognised initiative by the bureau of international of recycling. In the programme, WOW reaches out to schools, institutions and homes through its awareness building teams, about source segregation of waste. After a stipulated period of time, the WOW team goes back to collect the waste kept aside by schools/institutions/homes, and pays them for the recyclables collected. In Chennai, WOW has tied up with 30-40 IT companies including Infosys, IBM, and Wipro, which would sell their waste paper to ITC for recycling. It also plans to tie up with residential welfare associations (RWAs), NGOs and local bodies to expand the waste paper collection programme. According to IPMA, government intervention is necessary to encourage segregation at source and increase recycling to minimise landfill and related environmental hazards. Given that the paper recycling patterns are irregular in India at present, recycling paper has a tremendous potential to be exploited on a commercial scale. One can argue that one can develop a very respectable income collecting and selling paper to the recycling centres. It certainly does not take any education, specialised training or experience; it’s as simple as saving your old newspapers and turning them in to a central collection depot.
    03/01/2013
  • 101
    Middle East Paper industry Meets 50% Of Local Demand, Up From 38% In 2008
    JULY-2012 – Major players in the region’s approx. $10 billion industry to meet at 5th Paper Arabia exhibition from 1-3 October 2012 The Middle East paper industry, one of the fastest growing in the world, meets half of the requirements of local consumption. This is an increase of 12 percent over 2008, when the local production met just 38 percent of demand. The region is thus less dependent on import of tissues from outside the Arab region, as mills increase their production. This was revealed on the sidelines of the announcement of Paper Arabia 2012, a three-day exhibition that will be held at the Dubai International Exhibition Centre from October 1 to 3. Commenting on the event, Mr. Satish Khanna, General Manager, Al Fajer Information and Services, said: “Paper Arabia is getting continued support from some of the world’s biggest paper suppliers and paper machinery suppliers. Some leading paper mills and paper machinery suppliers will be using the show as their platform to explore the Middle East market for the first time.” Paper Arabia 2012 will bring together players from the paper, tissue and converting sectors. The show will offer opportunities to manufactures and suppliers of finished products, equipment, machinery, paper chemicals, services, supplies of paper, tissue and converting sector to tap the Middle East and North African markets. Khanna revealed that the paper industry has registered spectacular growth in recent years, with production centers, paper mills and paper converting businesses increasing in numbers and output. He said this year’s event will place greater emphasis on the tissue and converting industries, taking into consideration that domestic production of tissues is increasing each year and there is less dependence on imported tissues. Paper Arabia, with more than 175 exhibitors from 30 countries from across the world, will be a key platform for traders and industry players to network. The show’s participants include leading global names from the Taiwan, Turkey, Austria, Philippines, Pakistan, Spain, Russia, UAE, Italy, Jordan, France, China, Netherlands, India, Indonesia, Egypt, Germany, India, USA and the UK. Khanna added that the number of exhibitors has increased by 15 percent this year, and more than 8,000 trade visitors are expected to visit the three day show. Middle East’s annual consumption of paper will cross 29 million tons by 2020, from 18 million tons in 2010, according to Asia Pulp and Paper, the second largest paper manufacturer and supplier in the world with operations in more than 65 countries. Asia Pulp & Paper is the Principal Sponsor of Paper Arabia 2012.
    03/01/2013
  • 100
    Ballarpur Industries to simplify corporate structure
    AUGUST-2012 – Ballarpur Industries, or Bilt, India’s largest paper manufacturer, will transfer two paper units to a step-down subsidiary that will ultimately be listed overseas as the Delhi-based company bows to demands by foreign institutional shareholders pressing for a simplified corporate structure. In the structural revamp, the flagship of the Gautam Thapar-led Avantha Group will exchange two copier paper making units for a rayon grade pulp mill, currently a part of the unlisted Bilt Graphics Paper Products (BGPPL). This will bring the entire copier paper business under Bilt Graphics which will eventually be listed overseas, either at London or any other exchange. “This internal restructuring was initiated as some investors felt that the copier paper business should be all together. It would be useful for listing as the structure would be very clean,” group finance director B Hariharan told.Of the industry capacity of 11.5 million tonnes, Bilt makes close to 1 million tonnes annually. The company plans to raise its pulp production by 290,000 tonnes mainly from its Malaysian unit. Institutional investors have been pressing for a simplified structure that would contain only paper and paper-related pulp as part of a single business to prop up valuations. Rayon grade pulp, which is not used in paper making, will now be shifted to Bilt. Some of the large investors in Bilt include LIC with 6.7%, Samena Special Situations Fund (5.9%), Platinum Fund 5.2%, Samena Capital 5%. General Insurance Corp 1.9% and HDFC Prudence 1.6%. The exercise will not reduce the valuation of parent company Bilt, as Bilt Graphics Paper is a subsidiary, said Mr. Hariharan, adding that there will be no change in the shareholding pattern. Bilt’s other subsidiaries include Ballarpur International Graphic Paper Holdings B.V, Sabah Forest Industries, Malaysia’s largest pulp and paper company and Bilt Tree Tech Limited which runs Bilt’s farm forestry programme in several states in India. Simplification of corporate structures to boost valuations have become a large trend with mining major Vedanta Resources and infrastructure company GMR Corp recently initiating efforts in that direction. Professional services firms Price Waterhouse and KPMG were mandated to prepare the valuation reports for Bilt and BGPPL respectively. Under the transfer of assets, Bilt will pay 115 crore to BGPPL. Ballarpur Industries posted a revenue of 4,651 crore in the previous fiscal year – the company’s financial year ends on June 30. Of this, the paper and paper products and office supplies accounts for 88%, while it accounts for about 71% of the operating profit. In 2011, Bilt had planned for a London Stock Exchange listing where it had targeted to raise $330 million to fund expansion and reduce debts. About $140 million was for expansion of the company’s plants in India and Malaysia, while the rest would have been used to cut debt. This was postponed after a large transaction in the Indian paper industry sparked re-rating of companies in the sector. In May 2011, US-based International Paper acquired AP Paper for about $423 million (then about 2,030 crore). Bilt also deferred the listing as equity markets turned choppy, said Mr. Hariharan. Rayon grade pulp, also known as dissolving grade pulp, forms a lucrative part of the operations of Bilt as the country has a shortage of such raw material. Viscose staple fiber companies such as Grasim Industries, are some of the large buyers of dissolving grade pulp from Bilt.
    03/01/2013
  • 99
    JK Paper banks on ColorLok technology to step up sales
    AUGUST-2012 – JK Paper is targeting end users of copier paper directly to push its products in this segment. It is looking at large information technology companies, public sector and photocopier services providers to step up sales of copier paper. The company is positioning its copier paper range on quality and cost savings for users following its exclusive tie up with HP for the ColorLok technology. ColorLok technology, which is exclusively available to JK Paper in India, involves surface treatment of paper that improves quality of print and compatibility with laser printers, inkjet printers, photocopiers and all DTP applications. JK plans to compensate shops offering photocopier services the annual maintenance contract which can go up to Rs. 7,000-8,000 for a photocopier machine, according to Mr. A. K. Ghosh, who heads marketing at JK Paper. “It is a huge savings for the jobbers,” he said. The move is significant in the context of the large production capacity addition for JK Paper in this segment. Odisha unit The company’s new unit in Rayagada, Odisha, will add an annual capacity of about 1.65 lakh tonnes of copier papers in 2013. Some of the older capacities will be diverted to other paper segments. As the market absorbs the capacity addition, JK Paper will step up copier production in the subsequent year. Copier paper demand The total annual copier paper demand in the domestic market is estimated at about six lakh tonnes a year, he said. It is growing close to about 10 per cent. Mr. Larry Tracy, Director, ColorLok, HP, who was in India last week as part of an awareness programme on the technology, said over the phone that globally about 10 large paper companies have tied up with HP for ColorLok technology.
    03/01/2013
  • 98
    U.S. Paper Companies searching trading opportunities in INDIA for Growth
    AUGUST-2012 – India is quickly becoming an attractive new market for the American pulp and paper industry, according to “Turning the page on India’s paper industry: A new chapter in investment potential and growth,” a new report from Deloitte. Growth in the Indian market is tied to a significant increase in demand, fuelled by a burgeoning middle class and a growing workforce waiting to be added to the worldwide employment rolls. According to the report, the U.S.-based International Paper (IP) acquisition of a 53.5 percent stake in Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills (APPM) in March 2011 stirred widespread interest in the Indian market. Prior to that, the paper industry in India did not appear to be on the radar of many multinational companies. “India’s paper industry is expected to grow at six to seven percent year over year, with the packaging industry poised to grow at 22 to 25 percent annually,” said John Dixon, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP. “India has 15 percent of the world’s population, but consumes less than two percent of the world’s paper. Meeting the growing demand will likely require a correspondingly significant investment in both new machines and upgrading of existing facilities.” The report analyzes the challenges to investing in India, which include inadequate investment in infrastructure, limitations on raw materials, lack of a coordinated and updated manufacturing policy, outdated labour policies, and lack of a broad power supply that has created a situation where only about 60 percent of paper-making capacity is being used. Companies that are considering entrance into the Indian market should do so strategically and should consider location. For example, states such as Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, and Gujarat, may be preferred locations for consideration because they may be investor friendly and closer to raw materials. “Paperboard and printing, along with specialty papers, are likely the segments with greater ease of entry and long-term growth,” explained Dixon. “Acquisition of or a controlling stake in a joint venture with an existing player with sizable assets can offer an attractive option for entry,” added Dixon. “India also allows 100 percent foreign direct investment (FDI) in this sector, making it an attractive landscape for foreign investment — one of the keys to growing the paper industry.” As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. In India this press release has been issues by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India Private Limited.
    03/01/2013
  • 97
    TNPL to commission de-inking line next month; net drops 14%
    SEP-2012 – Tamil Nadu Newsprint and Paper Ltd. has reported a 14 per cent drop in net profit for the first quarter this year, compared with the corresponding previous quarter. The company reported a net profit of Rs. 11.17 crore on net sales of Rs. 329.66 crore for the quarter ended June 30. During the comparative previous period the company reported a Rs 12.82-crore profit on net sales of Rs. 335.67 crore. TNPL expects to commission its 300-tonnes-a-day de-inking and 600-tonnes-a-day mini-cement plant in September. The de-inking plant will augment its present pulp production capacity of 840 tonnes a day. There will be surplus pulp available for it to market. The line will add to the topline and bottomline, according to sources. The paper manufacturer has received the Forest Management and Chain of Custody Certificate from the Forest Stewardship Council, an independent, global, non-profit organisation, which is a mark of responsible exploitation of wood. The certificate covers 19,561 hectares, the largest area certified by FSC in India. TNPL can use the FSC label on all its products made from FSC-certified wood. This certificate is valid for five years, up to July 2017.
    03/01/2013
  • 96
    Pak traders mull ‘cheaper’ paper imports from India
    SEP-2012 – A 23-member delegation of paper merchants from Pakistan led by Pakistan Industrial and Traders Associations Front chairman Sohail Lashari and Paper Board Traders Standing Committees chairman Khamis Saeed Butt arrived in Amritsar on Friday to explore trade opportunities for importing paper from India. Lashari and Butt said they will be holding discussions with the representatives of paper industry in India and will provide feedback to Pakistan about the potential of paper import from India and its benefits to Pakistan. The delegation will also explore possibility of transfer of machinery and technology involved in paper manufacturing. Currently, Pakistan only imports newsprints from Amritsar-based Khanna Paper Mill and does not allow the import of paper. “We are putting pressure on Pakistan to take paper out of the negative list so that we can import it from India, which costs less than the paper we import from Thailand, Indonesia, Norway and Sweden,” Butt told The Indian Express adding that paper imports from India would decrease prices of textbooks and other paper-related commodities in Pakistan. Butt informed that Pakistan produced 40 percent of all paper required in the country while 60 percent is imported, “The indigenously produce paper is not of good quality and is manufactured using recycled material. The shelf-life of the paper is also short. In contrast, the paper industry in India use pure pulp.” Sohail Lashari also informed of a black market for paper in Pakistan during peak season resulting in very high prices. The delegation is also scheduled to visit Khanna Paper Mill on Saturday where the quality of newsprint being provided by the mill will be discussed.
    03/02/2013
  • 95
    Make paper used for currency notes in India: Modi
    SEP-2012 – Emphasizing the need for research in finding newer raw materials to produce paper, chief minister Narendra Modi said paper for printing currency notes should be made in India. “It is a matter of disgrace that the paper printing Mahatma Gandhi’s watermark on the currency notes should be imported,” he said. Modi was talking at the inaugural function of the 51st All India Paper Traders’ Conference in India. Modi said that Gujarat is a major producer of paper in the country. It is for the first time the conference is being held in Ahmedabad. “Per capita consumption of paper is low in India and is a big importer of paper too. There is scope for increasing production, as well as research to find newer sources of raw materials, besides recycling waste papers,” he said. He cited Navsari Agricultural University’s experiment in producing paper from the barks of banana tree. Drumbeating about infrastructure in Gujarat Modi invited paper manufacturers to the state on first day of the three-day conference.
    03/02/2013
  • 94
    Opportunities galore for Indian entrepreneurs in paper industry
    SEP-2012 – ndustry in India is the 15th largest paper industry in the world. The industry provides employment to nearly 1.5 million people and contributes approximately Rs. 25 billion to the government’s funds. The Indian government regards the paper industry as one of the 35 high priority industries of the country. Given these estimates, this industry seems to provide some innovative opportunities for young Indian entrepreneurs. Currently, according to NIIR Project Consultancy Services (NPCS), India’s paper industry is worth Rs. 225 billion. It accounts for about 1.6% of the world’s production of paper and paperboard. NPCS believes that, in recent times, India’s paper industry has had an annual growth rate of 6% per year. According to NPCS, in the near future, this growth rate will go up to 10% because of huge spurt in demand for writing and printing paper. Currently, the basic demand for paper comes from products like, tissue paper, tea bags, filter paper, light weight online coated paper, and medical grade paper etc. The demand for these paper products is expected to increase in the near future. Also, according to NPCS, given the Government’s emphasis on education and alternative uses of paper, the domestic demand for paper is set to surpass the supply by 2015. These growth possibilities are likely to provide several opportunities for budding entrepreneurs in this industry. Furthermore, according to iloveindia.com, the Indian paper industry has been de-licensed under the Industries (Development & Regulation) Act, 1951 with effect from 17th July, 1997. Thus, interested entrepreneurs are now required to file an Industrial Entrepreneurs’ Memorandum (IEM) with the Secretariat for Industrial Assistance (SIA) for setting up a new paper unit or substantial expansion of the existing unit in permissible locations. Another important aspect of the paper business is that now Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) of up to 100% is allowed on automatic route on all activities except those requiring industrial licenses with prior governmental approval in the paper industry. The growth potential of the paper industry is visible with the rapid increase in the number of paper mills processing paper. According to iloveindia.com, closer to Indian independence, there were 17 paper mills in India, and today there are about 515 mills engaged in the manufacture of paper and paperboards and newsprint in India. These mills have been categorized into large-scale and small-scale industries depending upon their production capacity. Those mills that have capacity above 24,000 tons per annum are designated as large-scale paper industries. Overall, currently India is self-sufficient in the manufacture of most varieties of paper and paperboards. Some existing entrepreneurs in the paper business believe that, given the current state of the Indian paper business, the next big move needs to be in making the industry greener. In an interview at the Papertech 2012 conference, N Gopal Ratnam, CMD, Seshasayee Paper & Boards, said that “the country’s paper and pulp industry needs to lay special thrust on green initiatives to dismiss the perception that it consumes plenty of natural resources and pollutes the surroundings.” According to Ratnam, India is the 11th largest producer and consumer of paper in the world and it is imperative for the country to adopt green standards and conserve natural resources to ensure profitability. Also, an interview by a publication with KS Kasi Viswanathan, Chairman, PaperTech 2012 revealed that conservation of energy, environment, and water conservation are some of the other key objectives of the Indian paper industry. Thus, entrepreneurs wanting to target this industry could pay special attention to innovations in these problem areas that confront this industry. Since 2004, one young entrepreneur, Vijendra Shekhawat, Jaipur, India, seems to have shown an innovative solution to making paper production greener: This Jaipur entrepreneur has started making paper from an elephant’s dung. Today, Haathi Chhap, the brand of paper Shekhawat makes from recycled elephant dung, is estimated to sell at 40 outlets within the country and even exported, earning total revenues of Rs. 35 lakh in 2011-12. There are Haathi Chaap cards, notebooks, bags, photo albums and numerous knick-knacks. In recent interview given to a publication, Shekahwat says that “the elephant’s gastrointestinal tract cannot digest fibers well and thus its dung has the potential to form the pulp needed to make paper.” According to Shekhawat, collecting the elephant’s dung in Jaipur was itself a difficult proposition, as few workers were willing to sully their hands doing so. It had then to be disinfected and experiments carried out to see if it would yield the right quality of pulp for making paper. Shekhawat spent months on his experiments till he perfected the method he now uses. According to a publication, Shekhawat still personally collects the dung every morning. And, to improve its quality he supplies the owners of the elephants he collects from with green fodder for the elephant’s diet: Every 1,000 kg of dung yields around 150 kg of pulp. Given these recent innovative ventures in the Indian paper industry as well as the growth potential this industry has to offer in the near future, the industry seems to provide an ideal place for young and budding entrepreneurs to get their hands dirty.
    03/02/2013
  • 93
    FTA with SE Asia will impact our profit margins: Paper industry
    JULY-2014 – The free trade agreement (FTA) plan with the Southeast Asian countries is bound to create problems for the domestic pulp and paper industry. The FTA has increased duty-free import of paper from Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, impacting domestic players. Kasi Viswanathan, MD, Seshasayee Paper & Boards. Kasi Viswanathan, MD, Seshasayee Paper & Boards. Kasi Viswanathan, MD, Seshasayee Paper & Boards, said, “The input costs for the domestic paper industry has gone up along with the increase in the wood prices by 90%. This has created a pressure on the profit margins of paper companyies, ‘’ he said, on the sidelines of the 8th PaperTech 2014 summit organised by the CII. “We are asking the government to have a relook into the FTA, which has made a major impact on the Indian industry. We have also made a representation to the government about the increasing imports levels, hoping for a positive outcome for the growth of industry,’’ he said without specifying the volume of imports. It is learnt that the 2.5% duty on paper imports has come down to zero on January 1 as per the terms of the free trade agreement it has with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean). Large paper manufacturers have resorted to import of costly pulp wood and the cost of production is also on the rise. “The wood prices have gone up by 90% in the last two years which has in fact increased paper prices in the last one year. There could be another increase as we are left with no options,’’ he said. The industry has raised paper prices by 15% in the current year. The domestic pulp and paper industry, with a turnover of Rs 40,000 crore, is struggling to cope with high input costs and chronic shortage of pulp wood. The industry is facing an acute shortage of domestic wood and has been forced to import wood for the past one year. At present, there is a duty of 5% on wood imported from non-Asean countries. The industry imported an estimated one million tonnes of wood in the past year. The landed cost of imported wood is about Rs 13,000 per tonne “We are seeking a level-playing field as the imported paper, especially copier paper, is cheaper by Rs. 2,000. This comes at a time when the industry is already facing challenges in terms of power, water and wood shortage,’’ he said. The industry was growing at a rate of 6-7% in the last few year but has seen a degrowth of 1% last year due to imports, he added.
    02/12/2015
  • 92
    TNPL bags Dun and Bradstreet Corporate award
    AY – 2015 – The Tamil Nadu Newsprint and Papers Limited (TNPL) has bagged the Dun and Bradstreet Corporate award under the paper and paper products category.TNPL logo Dun and Bradstreet India has selected TNPL as top Indian company under the paper and paper products category and the award was received by A. Velliangiri, Deputy Managing Director, TNPL, from Bibek Debroy, permanent member, NITI Aayog, in Mumbai recently, according to a TNPL release. This is the fourth consecutive year that the TNPL had bagged the award, the release added.
    08/24/2015
  • 91
    JK Paper to scale up exports; eyes Middle East, African markets
    MAY – 2015 – JK Paper plans to increase export volumes by up to 20 per cent and is eyeing Middle East, South Asian jk paperand African markets, riding high on availability of additional capacity from its new Orissa plant. ” After commencement of our Rayagada plant in Orissa, our paper production increased to 4.55 lakh tonnes from 1.65 lakh tonnes. This fiscal we are targeting to export 45,000 to 50,000 tonnes of paper. We are looking for markets in Middle East, Africa and South Asian countries.“ The company, one of the leading paper manufacturers in the domestic market, is aiming to export up to 50,000 tonnes of paper this fiscal as compared to 40,000 tonnes in FY15. Earlier, JK Paper’s export was between 12,000 to 15,000 tonnes only in FY14 and the company got a major boost after its Rs. 1,900-crore plant in Orissa was commissioned in 2013. For the domestic market, he said the company is expanding distribution network, focusing on tier II & III places. “Last year, we took our distribution network to up to 130 and this fiscal we are planning to take it to 180 by adding around 50 more,” A.S. Mehta said, adding that the company has expanded product portfolio to address a wider range of customers. “In the copier segment last year, we launched JK Max series in the economy segment and it has increased our volume by three per cent,” he said. On plantation front, he said JK Paper would continue to plant 16,000 to 17,000 hectares every year to be a green company. “We are a net green company. We would continue to plant 16,000 to 17,000 hectares every year in the radius of 200 kms of our plant,” he said. Till date, JK Paper has planted over 1.33 lakh hectares of land, the company said. JK Paper’s consolidated net sales in FY15 was Rs 2,160.11 crore, up 24.29 per cent as against Rs 1,737.93 crore in 2013-14. About JK Paper With a combined capacity of 4,55,000 TPA, JK Paper, a unit of JK Organisation is India’s largest producer of Branded Papers and a leading player in Coated Papers and High-end Packaging Boards. The Company began its journey more than half a century ago with 18,000 tons per annum capacity paper plant. It has grown over the years and maintained its quality leadership position. When Paper industry was content with producing ordinary Cream Wove quality, JK pioneered in 1962 the Surface sized Maplitho Paper (popularly came to be called ‘JK Maplitho’ – a premium quality printing paper ideally suited for the Litho Printing process. ‘JK Maplitho’ became Industry Benchmark. JK Paper has been constantly creating value in a highly capital intensive and cyclical business, where volume is traditionally considered as Key profit driver. Most companies concentrated on increasing capacity, JK Paper responded with a Brand driven strategy, with customer at its heart. JK Paper was among the earliest to invest in state-of-the-art A4 cutting lines for mass production of these products. JK Paper is synonymous with premium quality paper, which is reflected in customer’s trust in its products enjoying the ‘Brand’ status among its competitors. JK Copier’s status as the largest selling multifunctional office paper is not by chance but its efforts over the years.
    08/25/2015
  • 90
    International Paper APPM nets Rs. 6.7 cr. in Q4
    MAY – 2015 – International Paper APPM Ltd has more than doubled its net profit to Rs. 6.79 core for the quarter ended March 31, 2015, as against a profit of Rs. 3.19 crore for the corresponding quarter last year. The paper company total income for the March quarter was up at Rs. 297.28 crore as against Rs. 288.13 crore for the corresponding quarter last year. For the year ended March 31, 2015, the company brought down its losses significantly to Rs. 0.24 crore and the total income was up at Rs. 1144.17 crore as against a loss of Rs. 41.61 crore and a turnover of Rs. 1097.48 crore for the pervious fiscal. In a regulatory filing made with BSE, the company has informed that Jayashree Satagopan has resigned as the Non-Executive Director of the Company effective April 24, 2015 and Ann Barbara Wrobleski has been appointed as Non-Executive Director of the Company.
    08/25/2015
  • 89
    Solenis Completes Acquisition of India Pulp and Paper Business Assets From CBC India
    MAY-2015 – Solenis Chemicals India Private Limited completed the acquisition of assets associated with the Solenis pulp and paper business represented by Connell Bros. Company (India) Private Limited in India. All assets associated with the Solenis pulp and paper business represented by Connell Bros. Company (India) Private Limited in India are a part of the deal including the sales, technical, and operating personnel directly related to the paper unit, as well as an AKD emulsion manufacturing facility. “India is now the fastest growing pulp and papermaking country in the world with 10.5 million tons of paper and board production and represents a significant growth opportunity for Solenis,” stated John Panichella, president and CEO. “ We have worked in close collaboration with the CBC India team for a number of years so this is a logical next step in our desire to provide total solutions to our customers in this market.” “This is another example of Solenis’ commitment to continuous investment in the pulp and paper industry and we are delighted to continue to build strong business relationships with our customers in India,” said Nandkumar Dhekne, vice president, Asia Pacific. About Solenis Solenis is a leading global producer of specialty chemicals for the pulp, paper, oil and gas, chemical processing, mining, bio refining, power and municipal markets….
    09/02/2015
  • 10
    India needs shot in arm for recycling paper

    AUGUST-2012 – Recycling paper, is essentially, turning waste paper into new paper. According to Tappi (the leading technical association for the worldwide pulp, paper and converting industry), the paper recycling process, involves mixing of wastepaper with water and chemicals to break it down. The broken residue is then chopped up and heated to convert it into strands of cellulose, called pulp or slurry. This pulp is then cleaned, “deinked”, bleached, and mixed with water and converted into new paper. Recycling paper has a big impact on saving wood that is used to generate the paper. For example, according to the environmental paper network, recycling a tonne of newsprint saves about a tonne of wood, while recycling a tonne of printing or copier paper, saves slightly more than two tonnes of wood. Also, it is believed that recycling paper saves energy. For example, the energy information administration claims a 40 per cent reduction in energy when paper is recycled, compared with paper made with unrecycled pulp, while the bureau of international recycling (BIR) claims a 64 per cent reduction. In addition, the US environmental protection agency (EPA) has found that recycling causes 35 per cent less water pollution and 74 per cent less air pollution than making new paper. Also, according to EPA, about 35 per cent of municipal solid waste (before recycling) by weight is paper and paper products that would not enter landfills if it is recycled. Although, the potential and benefits for recycling paper seem immense, very little paper is recycled in India. According to the Indian Paper Manufacturers Association (IPMA), in India, only about 20 per cent waste paper is being recycled every year. This low recycling rate is mainly on account of alternate use of paper in wrapping, packing, and the lack of source segregation that makes waste paper contaminated and unusable. Thus, India lacks collection, sorting and grading system of waste paper for proper utilisation. IPMA believes that this rate of paper recycling in India is very low, compared with other countries. Paper recycling rate in Germany is 73 per cent, in Sweden, it is 69 per cent, in Japan, it is 60 per cent, in western Europe, it is 56 per cent, in the US, it is 49 per cent, and in Italy, it is 45 per cent. In fact, the US postal service recycles more than a million tonnes of scrap paper and $160 million worth of recycled paper each year. It has even won the environmental mailer award. In a recent report, the Central Pulp & Paper Research Institute (CPPRI) has stated that by 2010, about half of the global amount of fibres used in papermaking will be recycled fibres. However, the report admits that recycled fibre sourcing in India is a challenge. The 20 per cent Indian recycling estimate, is alarming given that the projected demand for fresh paper in India will be likely around 21 million tonnes over the next few years, according to ITC and Indian Agro & Recycled Paper Mills Association (IARPMA). This amount of paper consumption is likely, because in India, per capita paper consumption has been increasing: To 9.18 kg in 2009-10 from 8.3 kg during 2008-09. Also, given the poor recycling rate in India, unsorted waste and dumps would likely fill nearby landfills. In this regard, paper recycling seems to offer a partial answer to this problem, because every tonne of paper recycled, saves more than 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space. Although, India has been behind in recycling paper, of late, IPMA has taken a number of recycling initiatives. For instance, last year, ITC’s paperboards and specialty papers division, launched a waste paper collection programme called “wealth out of waste (WOW)”, in select areas in Hyderabad, Bangalore and Coimbatore, and is now, expanding it include more areas in south India, including Chennai. WOW is a recycling initiative that works towards spreading awareness about recycling and encourages people to segregate and dispose waste responsibly. It is an internationally recognised initiative by the bureau of international of recycling. In the programme, WOW reaches out to schools, institutions and homes through its awareness building teams, about source segregation of waste. After a stipulated period of time, the WOW team goes back to collect the waste kept aside by schools/institutions/homes, and pays them for the recyclables collected. In Chennai, WOW has tied up with 30-40 IT companies including Infosys, IBM, and Wipro, which would sell their waste paper to ITC for recycling. It also plans to tie up with residential welfare associations (RWAs), NGOs and local bodies to expand the waste paper collection programme. According to IPMA, government intervention is necessary to encourage segregation at source and increase recycling to minimise landfill and related environmental hazards. Given that the paper recycling patterns are irregular in India at present, recycling paper has a tremendous potential to be exploited on a commercial scale. One can argue that one can develop a very respectable income collecting and selling paper to the recycling centres. It certainly does not take any education, specialised training or experience; it’s as simple as saving your old newspapers and turning them in to a central collection depot.

    06/12/2017
  • 9
    K Chandrasekhar Rao wants imports from China curbed

    K. Chandrasekhar Rao has asked Prime Minister Modi to restrict imports of heavy machinery, pulp and paper from China. Sirpur Paper Mills in Adilabad and AP Rayon Paper in Warangal were hit by the import of cheap paper and pulp from China which has forced both the companies to shut down as their products are costlier than imported material, he said. “The Sirpur Paper Mills management, for whom I waived Rs. 6 crore pending power bills, says it is hit by Chinese paper/pulp. AP Rayon Paper Mills too faces similar problems. They sought concessions and I agreed. Our spinning mills are also hit by China which is attacking our economy,” Mr. Rao said. Requesting Union labour minister Bandaru Dattatreya to take up the issue with Mr. Modi and Union industry minister Nirmala Sitharaman, he said he would raise the issue at the next Niti Aayog meet with the Prime Minister. “China bazaars sell products cheap. You get it cheap, but it will work only for three months. Our cotton farmers are also hit,” he added. The CM said he was pained when top officials of Mahindra and Mahindra’s Zaheerabad unit and Shanta Biotech chief Shyam Prasad Reddy told him all the heavy machinery in the manufacturing sector were imported. “They aren’t great machines. Can’t we make them and create jobs for our people. We had HMT, but it was shut,” he said. The CM also asked Mr Dattatreya to make use of ESIC fund to the tune of Rs 14,000 crore for workers which are kept unutilised in banks. He said the state government would set up skill building units in every district. When he asked the audience including Mr Dattatreya to raise their hands if they feel the power situation is better than last year, all raised their hands. He said there are no power cuts in the state and it will have additional 3,000 MW by March next and provide nine hour power to the farm sector.

    08/24/2015
  • 8
    ITC’s papers division seeks raw material sources

    AUGUST-2012 – The paperboards and specialty papers division of ITC Ltd. is scouting for raw material sources and a scalable supply of it would determine expansion of recycled paper board manufacturing capacity, the company said. ITC has to arrange adequate raw material supply if it has to look at investment in the size of around Rs. 1,000 crore. According to Pradeep Dhobale, executive director, ITC Ltd., “Our requirements of waste paper for paper board manufacturing is around 10,000 tonnes a month, of which 4,000 tonnes are sourced from a few cities in South India and we expect this to be scalable around 10,000 tonnes a month, over the next two years,” he said. The waste paper collection is for company’s paperboard manufacturing. Adding up of 100,000 tonne paperboard capacity would require huge investments, of about Rs. 1,000 crore. We cannot invest so much in expansion without ensuring enough supply of raw materials,” said Dhobale. It initiated Wealth out of Waste (WoW) programme, in 2007, focusing on spreading awareness through schools in a few cities in South India. It expects scalable collection of waste paper from the South Indian cities, doubling the annual collection from the present nearly 48,000 tonne, to around 120,000 tonnes, in the next two years. According to company officials, collecting raw material for recycling within India could help save $2 billion of foreign exchange by way of reduced imports of wastepaper since the imports could be reduced. Presently, India imports around 4 million tonnes of waste paper from abroad, including the US and Europe, to recycle into paper boards. This is at a time when the country uses around 12 million tonne of paper and almost seven to eight million tonne of paper and paper board ends up in dumps every year, and in landfills. “We can reduce reliance on imported raw materials for paperboard manufacturing if we increase recycling. We are planning to cover all major South Indian cities under the initiative in the next couple of years,” said Dhobale recently, when the company launched its WoW initiative in Chennai. WoW programme, started with 100 tonnes of waste paper collection, is presently operational in Hyderabad, Chennai, Bangalore, Kochi, Coimbatore, Trichy, Erode and Madurai, and has the support of 3 million citizens, 500,000 school children, 350 corporates, over 1,000 commercial establishments and around 200 industries. It has a tie-up with Hyderabad-based Ramky Group for collection, segregation and logistics of wastepaper, including door to door collection. ITC’s paperboards division would commission one more paperboard machine in its Bhadrachalam plant by October, this year. The machine, with a capacity of 1,00,000 tonne per annum capacity, would initially have 40 per cent increase in production of recycled paper board. The company at present has a total capacity of around 300,000 tonne of paperboard per annum, of which almost 175,000 tonnes are manufactured using paperboard while the rest is with materials like pulp. Of the total capacity for recycled paper board manufacturing, 100,000 tonne capacity is in ITC’s manufacturing facility near Mettupalayam, in Coimbatore, said Jogarao Bhamidipati, senior vice president (commercial), Paperboards and Specialty Papers Division, ITC Ltd.

    03/01/2013
  • 7
    Indian paper mills to benefit from Islamabad freeing imports

    Indian paper mills are set to benefit from Pakistan freeing imports from India. Following the recent permission to allow import of newsprint from India, the neighbouring country is likely to free import of other varieties of paper by the year end. According to representatives of the All Pakistan Paper Merchants Association, which met with the Indian Paper Manufacturers Association, the trade there is hopeful that the Government will allow imports of a wider variety of paper by the year end. Pakistan needs about 4 lakh tonnes of paper, annually, but the domestic production, mostly from recycled paper, meets just about half the requirement. The balance is imported from Europe and elsewhere, according to the Association’s president, Khamis Saeed Butt. Cheaper from India Speaking over the telephone following the meeting with IPMA representatives in Delhi, the Merchants Association’s chief said Pakistan and India could benefit by the trade. Imports for Pakistan would be at least 20 per cent cheaper from India than from Europe and the waiting time for consignments would be reduced to days instead of weeks and months. The industry there is pushing for getting paper out of the negative list. Newsprint is outside the negative list, and extending that benefit to printing paper will help even more. Pakistan is focussing on the education sector and good quality printing and writing paper is an essential need. Madhukar Mishra, President of the Manufacturers Association, which represents the large paper mills, said India exports about 3.5 lakh tonnes of paper annually. The port route Even a portion of the potential 2 lakh tonne market in Pakistan will represent a significant benefit for large paper mills particularly in the North. Paper could be supplied by the land route within a week as compared with a month or more needed to import from Sweden or Pakistan. Sohail Lashari of the Lahore Chamber of Commerce and Industry, who led the delegation, said domestic demand is growing by about 7 per cent annually but production does not match demand. Imports are inevitable, and India and Pakistan could both benefit from this trade partnership. An industry expert said at least one-fourth of Pakistan’s imports could be met from India. Apart from the land route, port-based exports can reach the hinterland more effectively, and this presents a widespread opportunity for the Indian industry.

    03/02/2013
  • 6
    ITC Paper unit expansion awaits land allotment

    The Paperboards and Speciality Papers Division of ITC Ltd. is awaiting land allotment for its Rs. 3,500-crore brownfield expansion project adjacent to its existing plant at Badrachalam in Andhra Pradesh. “The matter of land allotment is now part of the mega projects awaiting nods. This expansion project is part of projects under consideration by the Prime Minister’s Office, which is looking into various issues relating to implementation hurdles,” Sanjay K. Singh, Divisional Chief Executive, ITC Ltd. PSPD, said. Sanjay Singh told Business Line that the company requires about 1,000 acres for expansion which will enable them to double its manufacturing capacity from the existing 5,00,000-tonnes-a-year capacity. The location is ideal but involves forest land allocation. The norms for allotment of forest land are stringent. The company has to undertake afforestation to compensate for the land allotted. A site in Ananthapur has been considered for development of forest tract, he said. The project has been under consideration for nearly two years and has the support of the State Government. But the issue of land allotment adjacent to the exiting site has held up the project’s expansion. “We expect the process to take six months. Only after allotment, we can take up public hearing and seek other clearances. The site is ideally suited as it has access to the Godavari river and a large plantation,” he said. SOCIAL FORESTRY The company has taken up social forestry in a big way, engaging local farmers. It covers 1,35,000 hectares and every year about 15,000 acres get added to the existing plantations. These provide raw material and again get replenished, benefitting the farmers. The raw material and other input costs for manufacture have gone up and paper prices have firmed up by 20-25 per cent, quoting at Rs 3,000 a tonne, he said.

    03/02/2013